Nov 19, 2014

Secret Service and My Son the Mischievous Wanderer

This past weekend I learned that Secret Service agents are very forgiving towards children and my son has zero respect for red ropes.

Allow me to explain.

We went to Washington DC this weekend and my son managed to get into three restricted access areas in the Capital, Library of Congress, and the White House.

We went on a tour of the Capital and my kids were bored out of their minds. I don't blame them, I found the tour pretty boring too. You go in a big group wearing headsets to hear your tour guide. It's pretty easy to get distracted and let your kid out of your sight for 2 seconds which is exactly long enough for Mark to slip under a red rope to see a statue up close.

Not this one but notice that he's touching one? Anyone surprised?

After the tour we went to the Library of Congress to see the Magna Carta. I knew the kids wouldn't care but my cousin and I wanted to see it. The Gutenberg Bible was on display in the lobby and my girls were fascinated with it. I needed to pick up Mark and Molly so they could see it. Unfortunately I picked up Molly first. Mark couldn't possibly wait to see it so under the rope he went and hands and face right on the glass before I could grab him.

He left a kiss mark on the glass. It's important to leave a mark everywhere you go.



When we went to the White House I wasn't taking any chances. I held his little hand or kept him within 1 arm length for the entire tour. We made it through the White House without any incidents and we were walking out the door when Molly realized she lost her hat.

Brett and Molly went looking for it while I stayed behind with Mark and Isabella. Bad move mom, bad move.

As Brett was asking a guard if there was a lost and found place a women overheard them and said that Molly left her hat in security. They couldn't go back to security and they couldn't go back around to security so wait began for Secret Service to bring Molly's hat up. Now this is not a hat that I care about. It's a hand me down hat, no big deal if it gets lost. But Brett was pretty sure he has a great White House story to tell so he waited for the hat.

It took 20 minutes.

During this time I have no clue what is going on. The kids and I looked at the piano, talked to Secret Service, sang a song, and looked at the White House guide books, and I said sit still about 100 times. Maybe more, again I wasn't taking any chances after Mark's antics the previous day.

While I was getting the adult brochure book out for Isabella to look at, Mark took that as his cue to crawl under the rope to check out the stairs. Kids know just the right moment to make their move. Now he was only a foot or so under the rope crab crawling when I turned back around.

My heart about stopped when I realized what Mark had planned, he was trying to get up the staircase! I put on my mommy don't play face and said "get back here NOW!" You know the tone, when your mouth hardly moves and you didn't raise your voice but you are yelling at your child. He knew instantly that he was in big trouble and came back to me.

The secret service agent said it was OK, but keep a closer eye on him. And then he laughed and said that kids crack him up and told me it happens more than I would think. Then he told Mark what was at the top of the stairs why no one was allowed to go up there. He was actually very nice about it. I was still dying inside.

The title of this picture is

Remember the time we went to the White House and Molly lost her hat and secret service had to find it and it took 20 minutes and while that was going on Mark went into a restricted area of the White House?


It's a working title.

Seriously, my kid has no respect for red ropes. By the way, this is the same kid who crawled into a restricted access area of the USS North Carolina and I had to coax him back when he got stuck.

Anyone else have a little mischief maker in the family? What is the craziest place your kid has gotten into?

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